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Faith Today: Don't settle for wireless, plug in

By Morris Watson

Chilliwack Victory Church

Not all that long ago the idea of having electricity surging through the walls of our homes and through cables under the oceans would have been just the dreams of imaginative people.

The reality today is that we can’t imagine a world any other way. Electricity has become as vital to our lives as virtually everything else that we have, with possibly the exception of food.

Give some thought to what you wouldn’t have if you didn’t have any electricity. Your house would grow dark and cold and your car would cease to run and your Internet would die.

One of the things that has become a product of the proliferation of electricity is the radio and the ability to send electronic waves through the air and receive them in another location. This revolutionized communications because you no longer had to have wires strung everywhere.

It seems like almost everything is remote controlled or wireless in some way today. We have become annoyed with the concept of hardwired connections even when our computer is only a few feet from a port. I have to admit that it has certainly made things more convenient to have wireless connectivity on everything. The interesting thing is that, even though wireless is convenient it’s not necessarily as good.  Hardwired connections are still more reliable and able to carry more data at faster speeds than their wireless counterparts. Now, I’m sure that you don’t need me to bore you with this stuff, so let me draw a parallel for you in relationship to everyday living.

Our society grows increasingly disconnected from hardwired relationships. We are no longer tied together the way we once were with direct connections. Families, relatives and neighbours seem to be putting more distance between themselves in many ways. We have become the same as our wireless systems and we are trying to interact with no real connectivity. Social events are only considered successful when they are so big and busy that you don’t actually have any possibility to connect with anyone.

As a pastor I often hear that people are struggling to find others that they can have a real connection with. All through our society there is a struggle going on. People are looking for hardwired relationships and can’t find them because it’s all geared to being seamless and wireless. Somebody once asked if I thought that people actually reached out for relationships through online or telephone dating services. My response was that, those companies don’t spend millions on advertising because nobody calls. Of course people reach out through those mediums because they are desperate for meaningful relationships.

It is unfortunate but this problem has crept into all of our institutions, even the church. I understand that relationships can be messy and at times hurtful but we have been created as social beings that need interactive relationships to be well adjusted and fulfilled. This was the strength behind the early church in the Book of Acts as they connected through their common faith and social needs.  In our increasingly entertainment-oriented society we have become wirelessly connected and we’re not getting what we need to be fulfilled. Each of us needs to find that place of connection where we can plug in and get the level of input that we need. Don’t settle for wireless when you can be fully plugged in.

• Morris Watson is a pastor with Chilliwack Victory Church. he can be reached at morris@v-church.com.

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