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Jesus couldn't keep Chilliwack man out of jail

Chilliwack courthouse. - File
Chilliwack courthouse.
— image credit: File

The Chilliwack man convicted of mischief, fraud and uttering threats who hoped for divine legal intervention will serve nine-and-a-half months in jail in addition to the approximately two months already served.

Christopher Gauthier was given a psychological fitness assessment after police observed him talking into a jail cell toilet earlier this year in a supposed attempt to communicate with Jesus Christ.

The 43-year-old was arrested on March 29 after he tried to kick down his neighbour’s door and threatened him by saying “I’m going to kill you. I’m going to cut your head off and stab you.”

When police arrived, they called up a flight of stairs in the direction of Gauthier’s unit. He appeared and asked if he could finish praying.

Five minutes later, he came down and was arrested without incident, according to Crown counsel Brian Fell.

In the course of being advised of his rights, Gauthier told police Jesus Christ was his lawyer.

“The officer asked if he wanted to speak with legal aid instead,” Fell said in court in April, “and the answer was ‘No, I want Jesus Christ.’”

Gauthier repeatedly asked for Jesus, and even directed police to look him up in the phone book.

Gauthier received a global sentence of one year in prison, minus time served, for one count of theft under $5,000, two counts of mischief under $5,000, one count of fraud under $5,000 and one breach of undertaking.

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